Won’t Get Fooled Again

Tutt’altro che rassegnati. E neppure io.

Da Join Together. Se non sbaglio, l’ultima apparizione dal vivo (e da vivo) di Keith Moon.

We’ll be fighting in the streets
With our children at our feet
And the morals that they worship will be gone
And the men who spurred us on
Sit in judgment of all wrong
They decide and the shotgun sings the song

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around me
Pick up my guitar and play
Just like yesterday
And I’ll get on my knees and pray
We don’t get fooled again
Don’t get fooled again

Change it had to come
We knew it all along
We were liberated from the fall that’s all
But the world looks just the same
And history ain’t changed
‘Cause the banners, they all flown in the last war

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around me
Pick up my guitar and play
Just like yesterday
And I’ll get on my knees and pray
We don’t get fooled again
Don’t get fooled again
No, no!

I’ll move myself and my family aside
If we happen to be left half alive
I’ll get all my papers and smile at the sky
For I know that the hypnotized never lie

Do ya?

There’s nothing in the street
Looks any different to me
And the slogans are replaced, by-the-bye
And the parting on the left
Is now the parting on the right
And the beards have all grown longer overnight

I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution
Take a bow for the new revolution
Smile and grin at the change all around me
Pick up my guitar and play
Just like yesterday
Then I’ll get on my knees and pray
We don’t get fooled again
Don’t get fooled again
No, no!

YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

Meet the new boss
Same as the old boss

Questa la recensione di AMG:

In 1971, John Lennon traveled to Ann Arbor, MI, to appear at a combination benefit concert and political rally organized around the cause of freeing activist and author John Sinclair, who had been arrested for possession of marijuana, and ended up with a ten-year sentence for holding two joints. (It was Sinclair’s third conviction on marijuana charges.) Midway through a short set of political songs, Lennon stopped to address the crowd, saying “I’m here to say, apathy isn’t it…So flower power didn’t work. So what? We start again.” Lennon was hardly the only rock star having such feelings about where the counterculture that had so quickly bloomed in the late ’60s was headed in the new decade; in the wake of Kent State, Altamont, and the escalating Vietnam War, it had become increasingly difficult for anyone to remain optimistic about the hippie movement, and as Lennon succinctly put it, what most people called “flower power” had ceased to be a force to be reckoned with. Pete Townshend seemed to be having similar feelings in 1971 as he was recording what would become the album Who’s Next, and the set’s final song, “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” seems to be a more thoughtful — and more cynical — variation on Lennon’s statement. “Won’t Get Fooled Again” records the thoughts of one musician as he watches the changing of the political guard; revolution brings down the old leaders and the new firebrands take over, but very little actually changes besides the faces and the names. Bemused, our protagonist declares, “I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution/Take a bow for the new revolution/Smile and grin at the change all around/Pick up my guitar and play/Just like yesterday/Then I’ll get on my knees and pray/We don’t get fooled again.” Townshend seems to take the view that there’s little we can do to change the system, that power will inevitably corrupt even the most noble, and so rather than change the world around us, perhaps we need to begin by changing ourselves. While Townshend’s view appeared to be that widespread political change could only accomplish so much, the performance of “Won’t Get Fooled Again” burns with the passion of a true believer. Townshend’s pioneering use of sequencers and synthesizers gives the song an air of mystery at first, and then a rock-solid pulse that at once imposes an unusual degree of discipline upon drummer Keith Moon, and makes his bursts of tom-tom fire all the more furious. Meanwhile, Townshend’s crisp, precise guitar chords and John Entwistle’s fluid but thundering bass rock with both muscle and a keen intelligence, while Roger Daltrey’s howling vocal is one of his finest moments on vinyl. The song became the standard closing number at the Who’s concerts…

Rispondi

Inserisci i tuoi dati qui sotto o clicca su un'icona per effettuare l'accesso:

Logo WordPress.com

Stai commentando usando il tuo account WordPress.com. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto Twitter

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Twitter. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Foto di Facebook

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Facebook. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Google+ photo

Stai commentando usando il tuo account Google+. Chiudi sessione / Modifica )

Connessione a %s...

%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: