La laurea in rubinetteria

Ho notato nei miei viaggi (di curiosità e per diletto) che gli alberghi, quando ristrutturano i bagni, fanno a gara per scegliere le fogge di sanitari più avveniristiche, spesso a scapito della funzionalità. Non fanno eccezione i rubinetti e così ti trovi, nudo (e già non è un bel vedere, alla mia età) e spesso un po' infreddolito a cercare di fare uscire un po' d'acqua, magari non rovente o ghiacciata, da quell'arnese che hai in mano.

Questo, per esempio, è l'albergo di Amburgo dove sono ora.

Jerry Brotton – A History of the World in Twelve Maps

Brotton, Jerry (2012). A History of the World in Twelve Maps. London: Penguin. 2012. ISBN 9781846145704. Pagine 492. 23,04 €

A History of the World in Twelve Maps

penguin.co.uk

Jerry Brotton è un giornalista dalla BBC e il libro (se capisco bene) è figlio di una serie televisiva, Maps: Power, Plunder and Possession.

Il libro mantiene esattamente quello che promette: i suoi dodici capitoli illustrano ciascuno una tappa nella storia della cartografia e un problema nella rappresentazione dello spazio (e del tempo). Il tutto scritto in modo piano e convincente e ricco di informazioni curiose (di una ho già parlato qui). Non resta che augurarsi che sia rapidamente tradotto in italiano.

Ecco le 12 mappe:

  1. La scienza e la Geografia di Tolomeo

    Tolomeo

    wikipedia.org

  2. Lo scambio e il Sollazzo di Al-Idrisi

    Al-Idrisi

    wikipedia.org

  3. La fede e il Mappamondo di Hereford

    Hereford

    wikipedia.org

  4. La mappa del mondo di Kangnido

    Kangnido

    wikipedia.org

  5. La scoperta e la mappa di Waldseemüller

    America!

    wikipedia.org

  6. La globalizzazione e la mappa di Diogo Ribeiro

    Diogo Ribeiro

    wikipedia.org

  7. La tolleranza e la mappa di Mercatore

    Mercatore

    wikipedia.org

  8. Il danaro e l’atlante di Blaeu

    Blaeu

    wikipedia.org

  9. La nazione e la carta di Francia della famiglia Cassini

    Cassini

    davidrumsey.com

  10. La geopolitica e Halford Mackinder

    Mackinder

    wikipedia.org

  11. L’eguaglianza e la proiezione di Peters

    Peters

    digilander.libero.it

  12. L’informazione e Google Earth

* * *

Ecco le mie annotazioni, con i riferimenti numerici all’edizione Kindle.

Where would we be without maps? The obvious answer is, of course, ‘lost’ […] [238]

[…] ‘the map is not the territory’. [306: la citazione è del filosofo americano Alfred Korzybski, ‘General Semantics, Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Prevention’ (1941), in Korzybski, Collected Writings, 1920–1950 (Fort Worth, Tex., 1990), p. 205]

In Lewis Carroll’s Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893), the other-worldly character Mein Herr announces that ‘[w]e actually made a map of the country, on a scale of a mile to the mile!’ When asked if the map has been used much, Mein Herr admits, ‘It has never been spread out’, and that ‘the farmers objected: they said it would cover the whole country, and shut out the sunlight! So we now use the county itself, as its own map, and I assure you it does nearly as well.’ [315]

‘Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere.’ [446: graffito su un muro della stazione di Paddington]

‘Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair’ [1126, da Ozymandias di Shelley]

The Geography was the first book that, either by accident or design, showed the potential of transmitting geographical data digitally. Rather than reproducing unreliable graphic, analogue elements to describe geographical information, the surviving copies of the Geography used the discrete, discontinuous signs of numbers and shapes – from the coordinates of places across the inhabited world to the geometry required to draw Ptolemy’s projections – to transmit its methods. [1135]

[…] Septemptrio (north, from the Latin for seven, referring to the seven stars of the Plough in the Great Bear, by which the direction of north was calculated). [1753: ne ho già parlato qui]

A nonary square is divided into nine equal squares, creating a three-by-three grid. Its origins remain obscure, ranging from the archaic observation of the shape of a turtle shell (with its round carapace covering the square plastron), to the more convincing explanation that the vast plains of northern China inspired a rectilinear way of understanding and dividing space. [2436]

By the end of the sixteenth century the name finally acquired universal geographical and toponymical status, thanks to German and Dutch mapmakers who needed a name to describe the continent and one which avoided ascribing it to a particular empire (some maps referred to it as ‘New Spain’) or religion (other maps labelled it ‘Land of the Holy Cross’). In the end, the name ‘America’ endured, not because of any agreement as to who discovered it, but because it was the most politically acceptable term available. [3377]

[…] ‘devotion to truth and the precision of scientific methods arose from the passion of scholars, their reciprocal hatred, their fanatical and unending discussions, and their spirit of competition.’ [3485: è una citazione di Michel Foucault]

Flirting with religion on maps was a dangerous business, with potentially fatal consequences. [4294]

To make a heart-shaped map in the first half of the sixteenth century was a clear statement of religious dissent. It invited its viewer to look to their conscience, and to see it within the wider context of a Stoic universe. But such flirtations with ‘pagan’ philosophy were not always welcomed by Catholic or Protestant authorities. [4374]

The result still caused distortion of land masses at the northern and southern extremities, but if Mercator could accurately calculate how far apart to space his parallels he could achieve something unique: what cartographers call ‘conformality’, defined as the maintenance of accurate angular relations at any point on a map. [4625]

Born into the Mennonite movement, an offshoot of the sixteenth-century Anabaptists, with their strong tradition of personal spiritual responsibility and pacificism, his sympathies were decidedly libertarian, and many of his friends were Remonstrants or ‘Gomarists’ (named after the Dutch theologian Franciscus Gomarus, 1563–1641). [5005]

In 1636, following Galileo Galilei’s condemnation by the Catholic Inquisition for his heretical heliocentric beliefs, a group of Dutch scholars hatched a plan to offer the Italian astronomer asylum in the Dutch Republic. The plan was floated by the great jurist, diplomat (and Remonstrant sympathizer) Hugo Grotius – whose books were published by Blaeu – and was enthusiastically supported by Laurens Reael and Willem Blaeu. Beyond their intellectual belief in a heliocentric universe, all three men also had vested commercial interests in offering such an invitation. Grotius, having already written on the subject of navigation, was hoping to lure Galileo to Amsterdam so that he would offer the VOC a new method of determining longitude which, if successful, would give the Dutch complete domination of international navigation.32 Blaeu’s somewhat nonconformist intellectual beliefs coincided with his eye for a novel commercial opportunity: Galileo represented a new way of looking at the world, but it was also one that Blaeu might have calculated would give him a decisive edge in cartographic publishing in the 1630s. Ultimately, the plans to invite Galileo came to nothing, as the astronomer pleaded that ill health (and undoubtedly the terms of his house arrest by the Inquisition) prevented him from making what would have been a sensational defection to Europe’s leading Calvinist republic. [5099: è la storia che ho raccontato qui]

It was the product of a Dutch Republic that, following its violent struggle to break free of the Spanish Empire, created a global marketplace that preferred the accumulation of wealth over the acquisition of territory. Blaeu produced an atlas that was ultimately driven by the same imperatives. For him, it was not even necessary to place Amsterdam at the centre of such a world; Dutch financial power was increasingly pervasive but it was also invisible, seeping into every corner of the globe. In the seventeenth century as today, financial markets make little acknowledgement of political boundaries and centres when it comes to the accumulation of riches. [5359]

One toise was 6 French feet, or just under 2 metres […] [5532]

Newton concluded that the earth was not a perfect sphere but an oblate spheroid, slightly bulging at the equator and flattened at the poles. Cassini I and his son Jacques (Cassini II) were unconvinced, and followed the theories of René Descartes (1596–1650). Revered across Europe as the great philosopher of the mind, Descartes was also renowned as a ‘geometer’, or applied mathematician, who put forward the argument that the earth was a prolate ellipsoid, bulging at the poles but flatter at the equator, like an egg. His theory was widely accepted by the Académie, and the resolution of the controversy soon became a matter of national pride on both sides of the English Channel. [5589]

Ultimately, the Carte de Cassini was more than just a national survey. It enabled individuals to understand themselves as part of a nation. Today, in a world almost exclusively defined by the nation state, to say that people saw a place called ‘France’ when they looked at Cassini’s map of the country, and identified themselves as ‘French’ citizens living within its space seems patently obvious, but this was not the case at the end of the eighteenth century. Contrary to the rhetoric of nationalism, nations are not born naturally. They are invented at certain moments in history by the exigencies of political ideology. It is no coincidence that the dawn of the age of nationalism in the eighteenth century coincides almost exactly with the Cassini surveys and that ‘nationalism’ as a term was coined in the 1790s, just as the Cassini maps were nationalized in the name of the French Republic.
In his classic study of the origins of nationalism, Imagined Communities, Benedict Anderson argues that the roots of national consciousness grew out of the long historical erosion of religious belief and imperial dynasties. As the certainty of religious salvation waned, the empires of the ancien régime in Europe slowly disintegrated. In the realm of personal belief, nationalism provided the compelling consolation of what Anderson calls ‘a secular transformation of fatality into continuity, contingency into meaning’. [6046]

The consequence of all these changes was the emergence of a new genre, thematic mapping. A thematic map portrays the geographical nature of a variety of physical, and social, phenomena, and depicts the spatial distribution and variation of a chosen subject or theme which is usually invisible, such as crime, disease or poverty. Although used as early as the 1680s in meteorological charts drawn by Edmund Halley, thematic maps developed rapidly from the early 1800s with the growth in quantitative statistical methods and public censuses. The development of probability theory and the ability to regulate error in statistical analysis allowed the social sciences to compile vast amounts of data, including national censuses. In 1801 France and England conducted censuses to measure and classify their populations. [6169]

When Joseph Conrad’s protagonist Marlow peers at an imperial map in Heart of Darkness (1899), ‘marked with all the colours of the rainbow’, he is pleased to see ‘a vast amount of red – good to see at any time, because one knows that some real work is done in there’. [6205]

One of the society’s councillors, the distinguished explorer and pioneering eugenicist Sir Francis Galton, responded with concerns about Mackinder’s attempt to claim geography as a science. Nevertheless, he was sympathetic to the moves to adopt geography as an academic discipline, and remarked that, whatever the limitations of his paper, he was sure Mackinder ‘was destined to leave his mark on geographical education’. Galton knew more than he admitted: he was already in talks with the authorities at both Oxford and Cambridge universities to appoint an RGS-funded reader in the subject, a society aspiration that stretched back to the early 1870s, and had stage-managed Mackinder’s invitation so that he would emerge as the most obvious candidate for any new post. On 24 May 1887, less than four months after Mackinder’s talk, Oxford University agreed to establish a five-year Readership in Geography, supported by RGS funds. The following month Mackinder was formally appointed, on a yearly salary of £300. [6321: anche Galton è un nostro vecchio amico, come si illustra qui]

[…] the disastrous Boer War (1899–1902), which had cost Britain more than £220 million, as well as the loss of 8,000 troops killed in action and a further 13,000 to disease. Of the estimated 32,000 Boers who died, the vast majority were women and children who died in British ‘concentration camps’, the first time such methods had been used in modern warfare. [6475]

Such criticisms suggested the need for a debate (not pursued for several years) as to how any world map could meaningfully address statistically derived social inequalities in graphic form. [6916]

For Google, one justification of its geospatial applications is that the digital image of the earth becomes the medium through which all information is accessed; writing in 2007, Michael T. Jones claimed that Google ‘inverts the roles of Web browser as application and map as content, resulting in an experience where the planet itself is the browser’. The Earth application – according to Google – is the first place a viewer goes to access and view information. This seems, for the moment at least, to be a completely pure definition of a world map made up from its own cultural beliefs and assumptions, all of which are now potentially available at the click of a computer mouse. [7733]

In 1970, the American geographer Waldo Tobler famously invoked what he called ‘the first law of geography: everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things’. [7747]

Per ripartire di slancio: caffè o pisolino? | Wired.com

Devi riprendere slancio. Una tazzina o due di caffè o 10-20 minuti di sonno hanno entrambi proprietà ricostituenti. Quale scegliere? Wired Science lo spiega in un articolo definitivo di Vanessa Gregory pubblicato il 6 ottobre. Qui l’originale: Know Whether to Caffeinate or Nap | Wired Science | Wired.com. Sotto azzardo la mia traduzione

Sip or nap?

wired.com / ghirson / Flickr

Hai il mal di testa? Beviti un caffè.
Il caffè è un blando analgesico e facilita l’assorbimento degli altri antidolorifici. Espresso e aspirina: funziona. Ma attenzione: l’eccesso di caffeina può aumentare la frequenza degli attacchi di cefalea.

Vuoi correre più forte? Beviti un caffè.
La caffeina agisce positivamente su velocità e resistenza, con un effetto positivo sulla performance complessiva compreso tra l’1 e il 3%. Per il tuo doping, se sei un dilettante maschio sugli 80 kg come me, ti servirà una tazza e mezza di caffè americano forte un’ora prima della partenza.

Sei imbronciato e di malumore? Beviti un caffè e poi fatti un pisolino.
Una notte insonne può rendere depresso anche un giovane adulto in buona salute. Tanto il caffè quanto il riposo possono migliorare l’umore, ma insieme fanno miracoli. Prima un bel caffè, poi un sonnellino di mezzora: ti sveglierai felice come un fringuello.

Devi prendere un bel voto a un esame? Fatti un sonnellino.
Secondo William Fishbein, psicologo e neuroscienziato alla City University di New York, una pennichella di un’ora è altrettanto efficace di un’intera notte di sonno quando si tratta di immagazzinare memoria dichiarativa, quella più utile per sostenere un esame.

Vuoi giocare d’azzardo? Fatti un sonnellino.
Un altro scienziato, William D. S. Killgore, professore di psicologia ad Harvard, afferma che essere deprivato del sonno è come aver subito un danno cerebrale, in termini di comportamenti e lucidità. La caffeina ti può tenere sveglio alle 2 di notte, ma non ti impedirà di prendere decisioni pessime.

Hai bisogno di una botta di creatività? Fatti un sonnellino.
Gli aneddoti di scoperte fatte nel sonno o al risveglio sono moltissimi: probabilmente perché il sonno REM facilita le connessioni neurali tra disparate. Ti servirà una pennichella di un’ora almeno, però.

400.000

In realtà li ho superati la notte tra domenica 7 e lunedì 8 ottobre, ma non è questo che conta.

Il primo post di questo blog l’ho pubblicato l’11 marzo 2007.

Avevamo superato quota 100.000 il 28 ottobre 2008, quota 200.000 il 19 marzo 2010 e quota 300.000 il 16 giugno 2011.

Dopo 2.038 giorni, Sbagliando s’impera ha superato questo traguardo con una media di 196 visite al giorno, con un piccolo miglioramento (2 in più) rispetto al traguardo precedente. Traguardo, però, raggiunto un po’ più lentamente: per passare da 200.000 a 300.000 erano bastati 454 giorni, rispetto ai 480 che sono stati necessari per i successivi 100.000. Ma non mi lamento: la crescita di FB e soprattutto di Twitter spiegano ampiamente la perdita di terreno dei blog, soprattutto del mio che propone soprattutto “letture lunghe”.

The Elephant's Child

http://www.67notout.com/2011/01/elephants-trunk-and-crocodile.html: a scene caught on camera by photographer Johan Opperman in the Kruger National Park

E naturalmente vi ringrazio tutti per avermi seguito.

Galileo, Grozio e la serendipità

Cominciamo con il raccontare questa storia chiamando in aiuto i sei amici di Kipling:

I keep six honest serving-men:
(They taught me all I knew)
Their names are What and Where and When
And How and Why and Who.

Six honest serving-men

lancescoular.com

Galileo Galilei nel 1636, dopo la condanna definitiva, viene invitato a trasferirsi ad Amsterdam da un inedito terzetto: Hugo Grotius, il fondatore della dottrina giusnaturalista, Willem Blaeu, il cartografo, che era anche l’editore dei libri di Grotius, e Laurens Reael, ammiraglio della marina olandese ed ex Comandante della potentissima Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie. I tre non erano mossi soltanto dalla tolleranza di cui all’epoca Amsterdam era la capitale, né da simpatie scientifico-religiose (erano tutti e tre copernicani e vicini a una corrente calvinista) ma anche da un interesse speculativo e commerciale, perché speravano che la competenza di Galileo li potesse aiutare sulle rotte delle Indie e in particolare nel perfezionamento delle mappe e degli strumenti di navigazione. Galileo, adducendo le sue cattive condizioni di salute (e tacendo, verosimilmente, di essere stato condannato al carcere e al domicilio coatto) declinò l’invito.

Non conoscevo questa storia. Non ne sospettavo neppure remotamente l’esistenza. Eppure mi reputo un italiano mediamente colto, senza esitazioni schierato nel campo dei difensori della scienza e della libertà di ricerca contro l’ottusa violenza della chiesa, lettore di Bertolt Brecht. Pensavo di sapere molto, se non tutto o quasi, di Galileo Galilei. Ne ho parlato molte volte su questo blog, dedicandogli direttamente o indirettamente o anche soltanto nominandolo in molti post:

  1. Empirico
  2. Consider the Lobster
  3. Peso el tacòn del buso
  4. Un benefattore incompreso
  5. L’eleganza del riccio
  6. Hammerstein o dell’ostinazione
  7. Galileo Galilei
  8. Un articolo che nega il rapporto tra HIV e AIDS: un aggiornamento
  9. Galileo, Giordano Bruno e Guarini (in rigoroso ordine alfabetico)
  10. Galileo, Giordano Bruno e Guarini (la saga continua)
  11. Galileo, Giordano Bruno e Guarini (ultimo atto)
Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (wikipedia.org)

Uno degli aspetti positivi dell’ignoranza è che, per quanto vaste possano essere le conoscenze dii una persona (e le mie, per quanto variegate, non si possono definire vaste), le possibilità offerte dall’ignoranza sono talmente smisurate da consentire che, da una parte, quello del lifelong learning non sia soltanto uno slogan, ma anche una prospettiva concreta; e, dall’altra, che le strade dell’acquisizione di conoscenza siano, se non infinite, abbastanza numerose da consentirci di raggiungere una nozione nuova da un versante del tutto inaspettato. Quello che si chiama serendipità.

Prima di entrare nel merito della mia piccola e personale scoperta, vorrei sottolineare che questo modo di stabilire collegamenti tra campi del sapere diversi e di reperire rapidamente (ma non superficialmente) informazioni è grandemente facilitato dal web e dai suoi strumenti, checché ne dicano detrattori, sociologi e franceschimerli.

Sto leggendo un libro affascinante di Jerry Brotton, intitolato A History of the World in Twelve Maps che, per l’appunto, racconta l’evoluzione parallela della storia della cartografia e della storia del mondo attraverso 12 fotografie scattate in epoche diverse. L’ottava di queste mappe è l’Atlas Maior di Joan Blaeu, pubblicata ad Amsterdam nel 1662, e parlandome Brotton racconta la storia stupefacente e a me del tutto ignota che riguarda il nostro Galileo.

Willem Blaeu

Willem Blaeu (wikipedia.org)

La riporto integralmente (sull’edizione Kindle è alla posizione 5100].

In 1636, following Galileo Galilei’s condemnation by the Catholic Inquisition for his heretical heliocentric beliefs, a group of Dutch scholars hatched a plan to offer the Italian astronomer asylum in the Dutch Republic. The plan was floated by the great jurist, diplomat (and Remonstrant sympathizer) Hugo Grotius – whose books were published by Blaeu – and was enthusiastically supported by Laurens Reael and Willem Blaeu. Beyond their intellectual belief in a heliocentric universe, all three men also had vested commercial interests in offering such an invitation. Grotius, having already written on the subject of navigation, was hoping to lure Galileo to Amsterdam so that he would offer the VOC a new method of determining longitude which, if successful, would give the Dutch complete domination of international navigation. Blaeu’s somewhat nonconformist intellectual beliefs coincided with his eye for a novel commercial opportunity: Galileo represented a new way of looking at the world, but it was also one that Blaeu might have calculated would give him a decisive edge in cartographic publishing in the 1630s. Ultimately, the plans to invite Galileo came to nothing, as the astronomer pleaded that ill health (and undoubtedly the terms of his house arrest by the Inquisition) prevented him from making what would have been a sensational defection to Europe’s leading Calvinist republic.

Hugo Grotius

Hugo Grotius (wikipedia.org)

La sua storia, a sua volta, Jerry Brotton l’ha trovata (e doverosamente citata) su un libro, questo: Rienk Vermij, The Calvinist Copernicans: The Reception of the New Astronomy in the Dutch Republic, 1575–1750 (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 107–8.

he Calvinist Copernicans: The Reception of the New Astronomy in the Dutch Republic, 1575-1750

amazon.com

Ma la cosa più bella di tutte – e scusatemi se mi esalto per così poco – è che il volume è integralmente disponibile online sul web in .pdf, talché ho potuto leggere la storia e sono ora in grado di riportarla verbatim per voi:

Calvinisti copernicani

Calvinisti copernicani

Laurens Reael

Laurens Reael (wikipedia.org)

J.K. Rowling offende i Sikh

Nel suo nuovo romanzo The Casual Vacancy, il primo dopo la lunga saga di Harry Potter, J. K. Rowling descrive uno dei suoi personaggi femminili, Sukhvinder, come «baffuta, ancorché dal seno possente», «un uomo-donna peloso».

Sukhvinder è descritta come appartenente alla comunità Sikh, e i Sikh (comprensibilmente, devo dire) se la sono avuta a male, anche se la proposta di censurare le frasi incriminate dall’edizione indiana del romanzo mi pare un rimedio peggiore del male.

Coppia Sikh

media.salon.com / Credit: imagedb.com

Ecco l’articolo di Prachi Gupta, pubblicato su Salon del 2 ottobre 2012:

Quote of the day

J.K. Rowling’s description of a hirsute Sikh “man-woman” has angered the Sikh community

India’s Sikh community has condemned J.K. Rowling’s recent novel, “The Casual Vacancy,” for describing one of the female characters, Sukhvinder, as “mustachioed, yet large-mammaried” and portraying her as a “hairy man-woman.” (Traditionally, followers of the Sikh religion are forbidden from cutting or trimming their hair).

India’s Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC), a Sikh group, has spoken out regarding the depiction. The Daily Mail reports:

SGPC chief Avtar Singh Makkar described Rowling’s choice of words as ‘a slur on the Sikh community’, adding: ‘Even if the author had chosen to describe the female Sikh character’s physical traits, there was no need for her to use provocative language, questioning her gender. This is condemnable.’

He added: ‘If anything is written against the Sikh maryada (dignity), we will write to [India’s] prime minister Manmohan Singh and urge him to take up the matter with the government in the United Kingdom for action against Rowling.

‘Nobody can injure our religious sentiments. If something has been written against the Sikh faith, I condemn it vehemently and strongly.’

Sikh leaders are evaluating whether they should remove the passage in Indian editions of the novel.

Sync!

Assolutamente affascinante.

Qui una sintetica spiegazione di come sia possibile (anzi necessario):

Watch 32 discordant metronomes achieve synchrony in a matter of minutes | Kurzweil AI

October 1, 2012
If you place 32 metronomes on a static object and set them rocking out of phase with one another, they will remain that way indefinitely. Place them on a moveable surface, however, and something very interesting (and very mesmerizing) happens, notes io9.

The metronomes in this video fall into the latter camp. Energy from the motion of one ticking metronome can affect the motion of every metronome around it, while the motion of every other metronome affects the motion of our original metronome right back. All this inter-metranome “communication” is facilitated by the board, which serves as an energetic intermediary between all the metronomes that rest upon its surface. The metronomes in this video (which are really just pendulums, or, if you want to get really technical, oscillators) are said to be “coupled.”

The math and physics surrounding coupled oscillators are actually relevant to a variety of scientific phenomena, including the transfer of sound and thermal conductivity.

* * *

Watch 32 discordant metronomes achieve synchrony in a matter of minutes | io9

Robert T. Gonzalez

If you place 32 metronomes on a static object and set them rocking out of phase with one another, they will remain that way indefinitely. Place them on a moveable surface, however, and something very interesting (and very mesmerizing) happens.

The metronomes in this video fall into the latter camp. Energy from the motion of one ticking metronome can affect the motion of every metronome around it, while the motion of every other metronome affects the motion of our original metronome right back. All this inter-metranome “communication” is facilitated by the board, which serves as an energetic intermediary between all the metronomes that rest upon its surface. The metronomes in this video (which are really just pendulums, or, if you want to get really technical, oscillators) are said to be “coupled.”

The math and physics surrounding coupled oscillators are actually relevant to a variety of scientific phenomena, including the transfer of sound and thermal conductivity. For a much more detailed explanation of how this works, and how to try it for yourself, check out this excellent video by condensed matter physicist Adam Milcovich.

Succede anche in natura, ad esempio con le lucciole:

Se siete rimasti affascinati come lo sono io, vi consiglio il bel libro di Steven H. Strogatz (Sync: How Order Emerges From Chaos In the Universe, Nature, and Daily Life), tradotto anche in italiano da Rizzoli anche se al momento – mi risulta – indisponibile (Sincronia. I ritmi della natura, i nostri ritmi).

I 70 anni di Felice Gimondi

Il 29 settembre Felice Gimondi ha compiuto 70 anni, essendo nato a Sedrina il 29 settembre 1942.

Felice Gimondi

biografieonline.it

Dei 3 personaggi pubblici che compiono gli anni il 29 settembre della canzone composta da Mogol e Battisti e portata al successo nel 1967 dall’Equipe84 – Silvio Berlusconi (1936), Pier Luigi Bersani (1951) e Felice Gimondi – quest’ultimo è senz’altro il mio preferito.

C’è una generazione di miei coetanei milanesi che in quei primi anni Settanta si riconosceva nel trinomio Inter-Simmenthal-Gimondi, forse in contrapposizione all’altro trinomio (certamente di molto inferiore) Milan-Ignis-Motta: ma chi non condivide quelle coordinate crono-spaziali di certo non può capire. E allora si accontentino, loro che non c’erano, alla sua biografia ufficiale (che riprendo da Linkiesta):

Felice Gimondi è nato a Sedrina (Bergamo), il 29 settembre 1942. Dopo una brillante carriera dilettantistica culminata con la conquista del Tour de l’Avenir (1964), è passato professionista nel 1965, centrando subito un traguardo d’immenso prestigio: il Tour de France. Complessivamente, in 14 anni di carriera, Gimondi ha ottenuto 81 vittorie, cui vanno aggiunte 59 circuiti, ha vestito per 24 giorni la maglia rosa e 19 quella gialla. Questi i suoi principali successi: un Tour (1965), tre Giri d’Italia (’67, ’69 ’ 76), una Vuelta (’68), un campionato del mondo (’73), due campionati italiani (’68 e ’72), due Giri di Lombardia (’66 e ’73), una Milano-Sanremo (’74), una Parigi-Roubaix (’66), due Parigi-Bruxelles (’66 e ‘76), due Gran Premi delle Nazioni a cronometro (’67 e ’68), due Trofei Baracchi (’68 con Anquetil e ’73 con Rodriguez), sette tappe al Giro d’Italia e sette al Tour.

Linkiesta ha pubblicato anche, proprio il 29 settembre, una bella intervista di Pier Augusto Stagi, il direttore di tuttoBICI e tuttobiciweb.it, che vi consiglio di andare a leggere per intero: Felice Gimondi compie 70 anni: “Il momento più triste? La morte di Pantani”. Io ne cito soltanto la piccolissima parte che si riferisce a Lance Armstrong, che condivido, e della diversa posizione su Contador, che condivido anch’essa.

Cosa pensi del caso Armstrong?
Bisogna conoscere bene le carte e tutta la vicenda, ma dico solo una cosa: se Armstrong non è mai risultato positivo in carriera, deve poter mantenere tutte le sue vittorie. È come se oggi la Polstrada mi desse una multa perché superai i 130 km orari tanti anni fa, quando non c’era ancora quel limite di velocità.

E del caso Contador?
C’è stata una positività giusto togliergli il Tour, ma il Giro del 2011 vinto sulla strada senza macchia è da ritenere suo.

Antonio Mattei, Prato

adambalic.typepad.com

Il 29 settembre compiono gli anni anche i biscotti di Prato di Antonio Mattei (quelli che gli altri chiamano cantucci, ma la ricetta originale è quella di Mattei), che li produce dal 29 settembre 1858. Li offro virtualmente a Gimondi, che sa anche scherzare sul suo nome:

Felice, come ti senti?
Felice per l’affetto di tanti amici, tanti sportivi. Felice di essere ancora considerato Gimondi.

Le 8 regole di scrittura di Neil Gaiman | Brain Pickings

  1. Scrivi.
  2. Metti giù una parola dietro l’altra. Trova la parola giusta e mettila giù.
  3. Finisci quello che stai scrivendo. Qualunque cosa tu debba fare per finire quello che stai scrivendo, falla.
  4. Mettilo da una parte. Leggilo facendo finta di non averlo mai visto prima. Fallo vedere agli amici di cui ti fidi e ai quali potrebbe piacere quel tipo di cosa.
  5. Ricorda: quando qualcuno ti dice che qualche cosa è sbagliato e che per loro non funziona, di solito ha ragione. Ma se ti dice che cosa precisamente ritiene sbagliato e come metterlo a posto, di solito ha torto..
  6. Mettilo a posto. E ricorda che prima o poi, prima di essere perfetto, lo dovrai abbandonare per andare avanti e iniziare a scrivere una cosa nuova. La perfezione è come inseguire l’orizzonte. Continua ad andare avanti.
  7. Ridi delle tue battute.
  8. La regola di scrittura principale è che se lo fai con abbastanza fiducia e autostima, tutto ti è permesso. (E questa potrebbe perfino essere una regola di vita. Ma è certamente una regola di scrittura.) E allora scrivi la tua storia come deve essere scritta: con onestà, e meglio che puoi. Non penso ci siano altre regole. Non regole che contino, comunque.
Neil Gaiman

brainpickings.org

L’ottalogo di Gaiman l’ho trovato qui: Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing | Brain Pickings.

  1. Write
  2. Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down.
  3. Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it.
  4. Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is.
  5. Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.
  6. Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.
  7. Laugh at your own jokes.
  8. The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it ­honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.

28 novembre 2013: al perielio una nuova cometa, più luminosa della luna

La notizia sullo Smithsonioan Magazine del 28 settembre 2012: A Newly Discovered Comet Is Headed Our Way | Surprising Science.

La nuova cometa ICON

The newly discovered Comet ISON is at the crosshairs of this image, taken at the RAS Observatory near Mayhill, New Mexico. Image via E. Guido/G. Sostero/N. Howes / smithsonianmag.com

As of now, Comet ISON, as it’s commonly being called, is roughly 625 million miles away from us and is 100,000 times fainter than the dimmest star that can be seen with the naked eye—it’s only visible using professional-grade telescopes. But as it proceeds through its orbit and reaches its perihelion, its closest point to the sun (a distance of 800,000 miles) on November 28th, 2013, it could be bright enough to be visible in full daylight in the Northern Hemisphere, perhaps even as bright as a full moon.